Art and Conscience | Ai Weiwei

‘Trace’ Ai Weiwei@Large

Screen Shot 2014-09-20 at 2.58.59 pmImage courtesy of New York Times

Ai Weiwei stands as an artist of exceptional personal integrity whose story is an extraordinary one to say the least.

I’ve admired his work and practice since I first saw some installation shots in 1999.

This year sees him installing works in the notorious Alcatraz prison as part of the @Large exhibition organized by For-Site. His installation ‘Trace’ consists of 176 portraits of political exiles and prisoners of conscience put together using a staggering 1.2 million Lego pieces. Out of the things that so many children have used to build and manipulate imaginative scenarios and environments Ai Weiwei constructs a tableau that serves to remind us of those who have either been imprisoned or exiled for actively resisting or exposing the wiles of oppressive regimes.

Read the full story here

Art and the Middle East Conflict

Gaza Strip — The images of so many houses destroyed, so many bomb blasts, even so many bodies wrapped in burial shrouds can begin to blur together, indistinguishable. But Belal Khaled, a young photojournalist and painter in this southern Gaza town, saw symbols and stories in the smoke all around him…….

GAZAART-1-master675-v3

Read the full article from KHAN YOUNIS here

Art + Jazz

Here are some interesting and quintessential album covers influenced by Modern Art aesthetic.

The delicate relationship between art and music is given the full treatment in this article 

Abstract: Jazz Uncovered

Read the full article here at BBC Arts

The Value of an Arts Education

10 Things that Art Teaches

1. The arts teach students to make good judgments about qualitative relationships.
 Unlike much of the curriculum in which correct answers and rules prevail, in the arts, it
 is judgment rather than rules that prevail.

2. The arts teach students that problems can have more than one solution
 and that questions can have more than one answer.

3. The arts celebrate multiple perspectives.
 One of their large lessons is that there are many ways to see and interpret the world.

4. The arts teach students that in complex forms of problem solving 
purposes are seldom fixed, but change with circumstance and opportunity. Learning in the arts requires the ability and a willingness to surrender to the unanticipated possibilities of the work as it unfolds.

5. The arts make vivid the fact that neither words in their literal form nor numbers exhaust what we can know. The limits of our language do not define the limits of our cognition.

6. The arts teach students that small differences can have large effects.
 The arts traffic in subtleties.

7. The arts teach students to think through and within a material.
 All art forms employ some means through which images become real.

8. The arts help students learn to say what cannot be said.
 When students are invited to disclose what a work of art helps them feel, they must reach into their poetic capacities to find the words that will do the job.

9. The arts enable us to have experience we can have from no other source 
and through such experience to discover the range and variety of what we are capable of feeling.

10. The arts’ position in the school curriculum symbolizes to the young 
what adults believe is important.

SOURCE: Eisner, E. (2002). The Arts and the Creation of Mind, In Chapter 4, What the Arts Teach and How It Shows. (pp. 70-92). Yale University Press. Available from NAEA Publications. NAEA grants reprint permission for this excerpt from Ten Lessons with proper acknowledgment of its source and NAEA.

Artists pull out of the 18th Sydney Biennale

“………The five Australian and international artists – Libia Castro, Ólafur Ólafsson, Charlie Sofo, Gabrielle de Vietri and Ahmet Ögüt – said in a statement they were withdrawing from the Biennale “in light of Transfield’s expanding management of Manus Island and Nauru immigration detention centres” and in response to the death of Mr Berati.

“We have revoked our works, cancelled our public events and relinquished our artists’ fees,” the statement said.

“We see our participation in the Biennale as an active link in a chain of associations that leads to the abuse of human rights. For us, this is undeniable and indefensible.”

A larger group of artists wrote to the Biennale board last week, demanding it sever ties with Transfield Holdings.

The five boycotting artists claim the board and Transfield indicated “there will be no movement on their involvement in this issue … that the issue is too complex, and that the financial agreements are too important to re-negotiate”.

The artists asked the Biennale of Sydney to acknowledge the protest by registering their withdrawal on its website and displaying signs at the site of the four absent projects. Two of the artists had submitted a joint work.

“In the pervasive silence that the government enforces around this issue, we will not let this action be unnoticed,” the artists said……..”.

Extract courtesy SMH

Read the full story and more here here and here

Banksy in New York | Better out than in

Banksy’s one month art residency stint in New York seems to have stirred the Big Apple from its deep sleep and has already provoked Mayor Bloomberg into condemning the artist and the NYPD into actively seeking his arrest for defacing public property. The public embrace him and the police chase him, it could only happen in New York. What would Robert Hughes have to say if he were still alive?

Check out this very cheeky animated gif 

Get the inside on the kind of nutters roaming the streets of New York including the Mayor here

The news of the residency was out and about in the artworld before it came to to public attention after the news media picked up on Banksy’s stall (post event) where signed original works were being sold to an unsuspecting public for $60. Video footage was released on the Banksy NY YouTube channel

Follow the full story at Banks’y website

 

 

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Images courtesy of Design Boom

Interview with Marcel Duchamp

Coinciding with the current exhibition on Marcel Duchamp at the Barbican, London, ‘The Art Newspaper” have released an  interview with the artist from their March 1993 issue which up until now remained unpublished.

This is a fascinating insight into Duchamp’s thinking

“Two years before Marcel Duchamp’s death in 1968, the Belgian director, Jean Antoine, filmed an interview with the artist in his Neuilly studio in the summer of 1966.

This was shown on French-speaking Belgian television in 1971 in the programme “Signe des Temps” (Sign of the Times). When the Video Library was set up ten years ago by the non-profit-making association, Jeunesse et Arts Plastiques, I suggested to Jean Antoine that he keep a U-matic video copy. A copy was stored in the Video Library of the non-profit-making association, Jeunesse et Arts Plastiques.

Apart from being broadcast on Belgian television, the interview has been shown several times to the mainly student audience of the association, but the text has never been published.

This transcript, edited for The Art Newspaper, is the most faithful rendering possible of the way Marcel Duchamp expressed himself. It is a remarkable document that gives us a fresh and immediate insight into his mind. Michel Baudson. @” The Art Newspaper

duchamp-bicycle-smiling

Read the full interview here

Lichtenstein Retrospective at the TATE Gallery

lichtenstein_web-banner

A major retrospective of the works of Roy Lichtenstein opens at the TATE Modern Gallery and runs from 21 February – 27 May 2013.

The opening header for the show from the TATE reads……..

“Tate Modern is proud to present a retrospective of one of the great American artists of the twentieth century.

Lichtenstein: A Retrospective is the first full-scale retrospective of this important artist in over twenty years. Co-organised by The Art Institute of Chicago and Tate Modern, this momentous show brings together 125 of his most definitive paintings and sculptures and will reassess his enduring legacy.

Lichtenstein is renowned for his works based on comic strips and advertising imagery, coloured with his signature hand-painted Benday dots. The exhibition showcases such key paintings as Look Mickey 1961 lent from the National Gallery Art, Washington and his monumental Artist’s Studio series of 1973–4. Other noteworthy highlights include Whaam! 1963 – a signature work in Tate’s collection – and Drowning Girl 1963 on loan from the Museum of Modern Art, New York.

The artist’s rich and expansive practice will be represented by a wide range of materials, including paintings on Rowlux and steel, as well sculptures in ceramic and brass and a selection of previously unseen drawings, collages and works on paper.”  sourced @ http://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/exhibition/lichtenstein.

For teachers of Stage Six (Yrs 11 & 12) HSC NSW a Case Study on the artist is available at STAGESIX

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 272 other followers