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1
Mar

Artists pull out of the 18th Sydney Biennale

“………The five Australian and international artists – Libia Castro, Ólafur Ólafsson, Charlie Sofo, Gabrielle de Vietri and Ahmet Ögüt – said in a statement they were withdrawing from the Biennale “in light of Transfield’s expanding management of Manus Island and Nauru immigration detention centres” and in response to the death of Mr Berati.

“We have revoked our works, cancelled our public events and relinquished our artists’ fees,” the statement said.

“We see our participation in the Biennale as an active link in a chain of associations that leads to the abuse of human rights. For us, this is undeniable and indefensible.”

A larger group of artists wrote to the Biennale board last week, demanding it sever ties with Transfield Holdings.

The five boycotting artists claim the board and Transfield indicated “there will be no movement on their involvement in this issue … that the issue is too complex, and that the financial agreements are too important to re-negotiate”.

The artists asked the Biennale of Sydney to acknowledge the protest by registering their withdrawal on its website and displaying signs at the site of the four absent projects. Two of the artists had submitted a joint work.

“In the pervasive silence that the government enforces around this issue, we will not let this action be unnoticed,” the artists said……..”.

Extract courtesy SMH

Read the full story and more here here and here
28
Oct

Cancelled due to Police activity

A first for the ‘artworld’

Kind of says it all doesn’t it.

banksyRead the rejected article that Banksy wrote for the New York times.

20
Oct

Banksy in New York | Better out than in

Banksy’s one month art residency stint in New York seems to have stirred the Big Apple from its deep sleep and has already provoked Mayor Bloomberg into condemning the artist and the NYPD into actively seeking his arrest for defacing public property. The public embrace him and the police chase him, it could only happen in New York. What would Robert Hughes have to say if he were still alive?

Check out this very cheeky animated gif 

Get the inside on the kind of nutters roaming the streets of New York including the Mayor here

The news of the residency was out and about in the artworld before it came to to public attention after the news media picked up on Banksy’s stall (post event) where signed original works were being sold to an unsuspecting public for $60. Video footage was released on the Banksy NY YouTube channel

Follow the full story at Banks’y website

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Images courtesy of Design Boom

9
Sep

Gregory Crewdson | In a lonley place

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Gregory Crewdson: In a Lonely Place from CCP on Vimeo.

4
Apr

Interview with Marcel Duchamp

Coinciding with the current exhibition on Marcel Duchamp at the Barbican, London, ‘The Art Newspaper” have released an  interview with the artist from their March 1993 issue which up until now remained unpublished.

This is a fascinating insight into Duchamp’s thinking

“Two years before Marcel Duchamp’s death in 1968, the Belgian director, Jean Antoine, filmed an interview with the artist in his Neuilly studio in the summer of 1966.

This was shown on French-speaking Belgian television in 1971 in the programme “Signe des Temps” (Sign of the Times). When the Video Library was set up ten years ago by the non-profit-making association, Jeunesse et Arts Plastiques, I suggested to Jean Antoine that he keep a U-matic video copy. A copy was stored in the Video Library of the non-profit-making association, Jeunesse et Arts Plastiques.

Apart from being broadcast on Belgian television, the interview has been shown several times to the mainly student audience of the association, but the text has never been published.

This transcript, edited for The Art Newspaper, is the most faithful rendering possible of the way Marcel Duchamp expressed himself. It is a remarkable document that gives us a fresh and immediate insight into his mind. Michel Baudson. @” The Art Newspaper

duchamp-bicycle-smiling

Read the full interview here

17
Feb

Lichtenstein Retrospective at the TATE Gallery

lichtenstein_web-banner

A major retrospective of the works of Roy Lichtenstein opens at the TATE Modern Gallery and runs from 21 February – 27 May 2013.

The opening header for the show from the TATE reads……..

“Tate Modern is proud to present a retrospective of one of the great American artists of the twentieth century.

Lichtenstein: A Retrospective is the first full-scale retrospective of this important artist in over twenty years. Co-organised by The Art Institute of Chicago and Tate Modern, this momentous show brings together 125 of his most definitive paintings and sculptures and will reassess his enduring legacy.

Lichtenstein is renowned for his works based on comic strips and advertising imagery, coloured with his signature hand-painted Benday dots. The exhibition showcases such key paintings as Look Mickey 1961 lent from the National Gallery Art, Washington and his monumental Artist’s Studio series of 1973–4. Other noteworthy highlights include Whaam! 1963 – a signature work in Tate’s collection – and Drowning Girl 1963 on loan from the Museum of Modern Art, New York.

The artist’s rich and expansive practice will be represented by a wide range of materials, including paintings on Rowlux and steel, as well sculptures in ceramic and brass and a selection of previously unseen drawings, collages and works on paper.”  sourced @ http://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-modern/exhibition/lichtenstein.

For teachers of Stage Six (Yrs 11 & 12) HSC NSW a Case Study on the artist is available at STAGESIX

18
Dec

The Ethics of Cultural borrowing

An interesting article appeared in the Australian tabling some of the hot water artists have found themselves in over the appropriation or re-representation of indigenous iconography.

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image courtesy of ‘The Australian’

“Imants Tillers expected no controversy when he showed his painting The Nine Shots at the Sydney Biennale in 1986.

The artist had built his entire practice on breathing new life into motifs or compositions by other artists without any trouble. So when some complained that his painting had appropriated imagery from Aboriginal artist Michael Jagamara Nelson’s painting Five Dreamings’, he was surprised to realise he had committed a kind of artistic blasphemy

“I didn’t think I had done anything wrong but other people did,” he says. “Referencing indigenous art was only a minor part of my practice at the time.”

Tillers came under fire for not seeking permission from Nelson to use the imagery. Aboriginal artist Gordon Bennett hit back on behalf of Nelson in 1990, creating a work called The Nine Ricochets that re appropriated Tiller’s imagery. Then, in 2001, an unlikely friendship emerged when Tillers and Nelson started painting together at the suggestion of Brisbane gallery director Michael Eather. “I feel grateful for having had the personal contact,” Tillers says now. “There is still a huge cultural gulf between a Warlpiri artist and a Western artist, but painting is a way of connecting.”  @ The Australian

read the full story

29
Nov

Everest Recycled

 

(Reuters) – Fifteen Nepali artists were closeted for a month with a heap of 1.5 metric tons (1.7 tons) of trash picked up from Mount Everest. When they emerged, they had transformed the litter into art.

The 75 sculptures, including one of a yak and another of wind chimes, were made from empty oxygen bottles, gas canisters, food cans, torn tents, ropes, crampons, boots, plates, twisted aluminum ladders and torn plastic bags dumped by climbers over decades on the slopes of the world’s highest mountain.

Kripa Rana Shahi, director of art group Da Mind Tree, said the sculpting – and a resulting recent exhibition in the Nepali capital of Kathmandu – was aimed at spreading awareness about keeping Mount Everest clean.

“Everest is our crown jewel in the world,” Shahi said. “We should not take it for granted. The amount of trash there is damaging our pride.”

Nearly 4,000 people have climbed the 8,850 meter-high (29,035 feet) Mount Everest, many of them several times, since it was first scaled by New Zealander Sir Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay Sherpa in 1953.

Although climbers need to deposit $4,000 with the government, which is refunded only after they provide proof of having brought the garbage generated by them from the mountain, activists say effective monitoring is difficult.

Read the full story

text and image courtesy of Reuters.com

29
Nov

Anthony Gormley | “Model”

(Reuters) – Britain’s foremost living sculptor Antony Gormley wants us to get inside his head with his latest work “Model”, a 100-tonne steel maze of cubes and squares, dark corners and splashes of light on show at the White Cube gallery in London.

The giant grey-black work, based on a human form lying down, is entered via the right “foot”, and combines the fun of an adventure playground with the unnerving quality of a labyrinth often plunged into darkness.

For the first time, the Turner Prize-winning artist who has always been preoccupied with the human form allows us to get inside, and draws parallels between the body and the architectural spaces we inhabit.

“I think we dwell first in this borrowed bit of the material world that we call the body,” Gormley told Reuters, standing beside the imposing structure made up of interlocking blocks.

“It has its own life that is unknowable. But the second place we dwell is the body of architecture, the built environment,” he added.

“We’re the most extraordinary species that decided to structure our habitat according to very, very abstract principles of horizontal and vertical planes.”

Model has plenty of surprises. The more nimble visitor can crawl through its left “arm”, which is a passage around three feet high, or clamber on to a roof bathed in light.

“There are places that you wouldn’t necessarily know are there,” Gormley said. As if to prove his point, he disappeared into a large raised “aperture” invisible in the darkness.

Sound also plays a part, with the resonance of voices and rumble of footsteps giving clues to the size of each space.”

Full story

image and text courtesy Reuters.com

29
Nov

Judy Chicago: Deflowered

Judy Chicago: Deflowered

The American feminist artist Judy Chicago, who is best known for The Dinner Party, 1974-79, an installation of 39 dinner place settings for mythical and historical women, returns to London for the first time in more than 20 years to show her work at the Riflemaker Gallery (13 November-22 December) and the Ben Uri Gallery (14 November-10 March 2013), her first UK museum show. Chicago’s early works on paper will occupy Riflemaker’s three floors, as well as the acrylic work Birth Hood, 1965, and pieces from The Dinner Party. “We wanted to explore Chicago’s influence on contemporary art,” says Tot Taylor, the gallery’s director.

“At a time where one of the dominant influences in contemporary practice appears to be art created ‘from a female perspective’ it might be said that Judy Chicago built on the work which had been done by Georgia O’Keeffe and Louise Bourgeois”

Full article @ The Art Newspaper

image courtesy of Riflemaker Gallery

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