STAGESIX

STAGESIX a resource site for HSC Visual Arts educators, students and the broader education community is now live. This site is part of project REWIRE and is currently in it’s initial phase of development. To get an overview of what STAGESIX is about click here or click on the STAGESIX graphic in the sidebar.

HSC Visual Art Resources

Every now and then something comes along that has all the hallmarks of becoming a future place of pilgrimage in the educational landscape. Emily Portmann’s new Stage 6 Visual Art WordPress blog site is just that.

HSC Visual Art Resources is Portmann’s response to the need for an articulate, concise and informative repository of case study resources for HSC Visual Art students and teachers.

Recently launched and still in it’s infancy HSC Visual Art Resources is already flush with quality content that is organized into a systemic and logically sequential flow of information that addresses the work of each cataloged artist in terms of biographical information, ‘Conceptual Framework’ breakdown, ‘Frames’ breakdown and relevant ‘Practice’ references along with a healthy selection of supporting images.

As Portmann so succinctly put it

“HSC Visual Art Resources’ aim is to become a data base of relevant artists explored as case studies for both teachers and students. Teachers can access new contemporary artists in which to add to their own programs and course content, whilst students can access this information as inspiration for their own artmaking (particularly in reference to their HSC Body of Work, BOW’s) as well as for their theoretical studies of art criticism and art history.” @http://hscvisualartresources.wordpress.com/

Emily Portmann is an acclaimed photographer entering a promising educational career.

I would certainly encourage any teacher and/or their students to do themselves a great service; visit the site and select any artist under ‘Recent Post’s’ in the right sidebar and enjoy the journey.

The Science of Neuromarketing

“The founder of NeuroFocus, the world’s biggest neuromarketing firm, is AK Pradeep, a PhD in engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. Five years ago, having moved from designing satellites to management consultancy, he found himself sitting next to a neuroscientist on a flight back from Atlanta: “I had just had a meeting with someone senior at Coke. He had been telling me that despite spending $3 billion on marketing and another $3 billion on indirect marketing, he was not sure what precisely he got out of it. This was still on my mind when I asked the neuroscientist what he did. He told me he helps children with attention deficit disorders, adults with emotional problems, and he works with the aged suffering from diseases such as Alzheimer’s. It struck me that this was exactly what the man at Coke was looking for. How do you get people to pay attention? How do you engage them emotionally, and how do you ensure they remember what is being said to them? Can’t I apply what he was doing in the clinic to what was happening?”

Read more here

Image: Siddhartha Dutta

The Beauty of Distance – Songs of Survival in a Precarious Age.

Part 1 of an interview with David Elliot, director of the Sydney Biennale 2010.

This interview was conducted at at Artane Gallery Istanbul in September of this year.

David Elliot talks about his background, his rationale for the concept and title for the Sydney Biennale and it’s connection to the region and what is happening in contemporary art.  He discusses the notion of ‘distance’ within the context of the concept for the Biennale. He also discuses the issue of notions of quality in art and his hopes for a shift in the dominant hegemony of Western Art.

“David Elliott is a cultural historian whose main interests concern contemporary art, Russian avant-garde and the visual cultures of central and eastern Europe, Asia and the non-western world from the late nineteenth century. Beginning in the early 1980s, he formulated a series of pioneering exhibitions in one of the first programs to integrate non-western culture with contemporary art. He has published a large number of books, articles and catalogues on these subjects and has curated many exhibitions. He has also written extensively about the present-day role and function of museums and contemporary art.”Vernissage Art TV

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ImiKnobel

In the Neue Nationalgalerie Imi Knoebel (student of Joseph Beuys) enters in a dialog with the spectacular Upper Hall of Mies van der Rohe’s New National Gallery. On display are his famous “Raum 19″ (Room 19, 1968/2006), “Batterie” (Battery, 2005), and “Zu Hilfe, zu Hilfe, sonst bin ich verloren” (documenta 8, Kassel, 2987). With Potsdamer Strasse 50 (2009), Imi Knoebel uses the windows of the Mies van der Rohe’s pavilion as canvas and thus creates a translucent enclosure for the works. With Imi Knoebel the Neue Nationalgalerie starts a series of exhibitions that invites artists to create work that refers specifically to the Upper Pavilion.

Part of the commentary is in German.