Dan Flavin in the Puerto Rican jungle

Only 6 people a day get to see the extraordinary setting for this work of Flavin’s. Installed in a majestic cave in the Puerto Rican jungle by artists Jennifer Allora and Guillermo Calzadilla, Flavin’s work interacts with light entering through the top of the cave to suffuse the space in an otherworldly glow.

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Read the full story here

Olafur Eliasson: Playing with space and light

In the spectacular large-scale projects he’s famous for (such as “Waterfalls” in New York harbour), Olafur Eliasson creates art from a palette of space, distance, colour and light. The transparent simplicity and experiential nature of his work has built Olafur Eliasson’s reputation as one of the world’s most accessible creators of contemporary art.

“Denmark-born Icelander Olafur Eliasson has taken the art world by storm — and the meteorological dimensions of that statement are appropriate. His immensely popular The Weather Project, at London’s Tate Museum, immersed spectators in an artificial mirrored environment with its own looming sun (and its own analogue of London fog), and attracted 2 million visitors in the process. In the summer of 2008, his four massive waterfalls spectacularly punctuated key sites in New York’s harbour — including one pouring from beneath the Brooklyn Bridge”. TED

Footage courtesy of http://www.ted.com/

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ImiKnobel

In the Neue Nationalgalerie Imi Knoebel (student of Joseph Beuys) enters in a dialog with the spectacular Upper Hall of Mies van der Rohe’s New National Gallery. On display are his famous “Raum 19″ (Room 19, 1968/2006), “Batterie” (Battery, 2005), and “Zu Hilfe, zu Hilfe, sonst bin ich verloren” (documenta 8, Kassel, 2987). With Potsdamer Strasse 50 (2009), Imi Knoebel uses the windows of the Mies van der Rohe’s pavilion as canvas and thus creates a translucent enclosure for the works. With Imi Knoebel the Neue Nationalgalerie starts a series of exhibitions that invites artists to create work that refers specifically to the Upper Pavilion.

Part of the commentary is in German.

Big Bambu

Named so after the infamous Cheech and Chong Album, this extraordinary two year undertaking by the Starn brothers has to be seen to be believed. Using (currently 2000) bamboo poles the artists and their team of assistants have assembled a continuously morphing structure that moves, envelopes and evolves along the length of their enormous studio. The entire process which involves de constructing the trailing edge and reconstructing the leading edge, is documented, and the resulting photographic montage will show an image of a construction that never existed in its exhibited state.
See the first part of the interview with the artists at

http://vernissage.tv/blog/2009/04/09/mike-doug-starn-big-bambu-talk-part-12/

and see more at
http://www.starnstudio.com/